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A still image from Mad Max: Fury Road.

Back in 1979, there was a movie that starred Mel Gibson about a guy living in a post-apocalyptic world reigned over by a handful of crazy petrolheads with very little regard for human life. 

It was called Mad Max and as the title suggests, it was indeed super mad. Fast-forward a few years and we got two sequels: Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981) and Mad Max 3: Beyond the Thunderdome (1985).

Each movie got progressively weirder but one thing was absolutely certain: you were served up massive plates of insanity that rendered the movies both absolutely ridiculous and thoroughly enjoyable in equal doses.

Now, 30 years after the last Mad Max movie, we have a new Max and a completely new level of bonkers in Mad Max: Fury Road. While the role of Max has been taken over by Tom Hardy, this instalment in the Mad Max franchise is seen as a sequel and not a reboot. 

It’s a continuation of the Max story after the events of Thunderdome but, luckily, you don’t have to have seen the previous movies for this one to make sense.

Hardy makes a good Max – a man who is traditionally of very few words and usually communicates with grunts, singe-syllabled words and his gun. 

And while the movie is called “Mad Max”, I’d actually argue that Max isn’t the main star of the movie, with a lot more screen time given to Charlize Theron’s character, Furiousa – a role that you can see she enjoyed immensely. 

Apart from Charlize, Nicolas Hoult’s character, Nux, and Hugh Keays-Byrne playing the villain, Immortan Joe, really stood out for me. Oh what a day…what a lovely day.

Bottom line, Mad Max: Fury Road lived up to every one of my expectations that were set in the 1980s. Unlike modern takes on classic 1980s movies like Total Recall and RoboCop, this movie kept the spirit of Mad Max intact and took it up to the next level.

It’s violent, funny in places, terribly offensive in others and doesn’t hold back at all, which makes this…probably…one of my favourite movies of 2015.

Well worth the rental fee.